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3d Marine Regiment

 

3d Marine Regiment

3d Marine Division

Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii
3d Marine Regiment
U.S. Marines with Combat Assault Company, 3rd Marine Regiment, engage an obstacle with an anti-personnel breaching system (APOBS) for training on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, September 13, 2019. APOBS allow combat engineers to breach large obstacles and enhance combat effectiveness. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Eric Tso)
U.S. Marines with 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment and Indonesian Marines conduct a live-fire range during exercise Korps Marinir (KORMAR) Exchange 2019 in East Java, Indonesia, August 13, 2019. The KORMAR platoon exchange program between Indonesian and the U.S. involves each country sending a platoon of Marines to live and train together at the other’s military base. This program enhances the capability of both services and displays their continued commitment to share information and increase the ability to respond to crisis together. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Eric Tso)
U.S. Marines with Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment and Indonesian Marines conduct a live-fire range during exercise Korps Marinir (KORMAR) Exchange 2019 in East Java, Indonesia, August 13, 2019. The KORMAR platoon exchange program between Indonesian and the U.S. involves each country sending a platoon of Marines to live and train together at the other’s military base. This program enhances the capability of both services and displays their continued commitment to share information and increase the ability to respond to crisis together. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Eric Tso)
U.S. Marines with Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment and Indonesian Marines undergo jungle survival instruction on plants and species that are safe to eat during exercise Korps Marinir (KORMAR) Exchange 2019 in East Java, Indonesia, August 22, 2019. The KORMAR platoon exchange program between Indonesia and the U.S. involves each country sending a platoon of Marines to live and train together at the other's military base. This program enhances the capability of both services and displays their continued commitment to share information and increase the ability to respond to crisis together. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Eric Tso)
U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Martin Sanchez with Alpha Company, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, drinks snakes blood during a jungle survival instruction part of Korps Marinir (KORMAR) Exchange 2019 in East Java, Indonesia, August 22, 2019. The KORMAR platoon exchange program between Indonesia and the U.S. involves each country sending a platoon of Marines to live and train together at the other's military base. This program enhances the capability of both services and displays their continued commitment to share information and increase the ability to respond to crisis together. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Eric Tso)
A U.S. Marine with Headquarters & Service Company, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, repels off of a rock face during Mountain Exercise (MTX) 4-19 at the Mountain Warfare Training Center, Bridgeport, CA, July 25, 2019. The purpose of the MTX is to provide a training and assessment that challenges units to plan and perform operational tasks across the warfighting functions in mountainous environment. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Wilson)
A U.S. Marine with Combined Anti-Armor Team, Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, fires a .50 caliber machine gun during Exercise Bougainville II on Range 20A, Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, May 15, 2019. Bougainville II is the second phase of pre-deployment training conducted by the battalion in order to enhance unit cohesion and combat readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Wilson)
U.S. Marines with Combined Anti-Armor Team, Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, send .50 caliber machine gun fire down-range during Exercise Bougainville II on Range 20A, Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, May 15, 2019. Bougainville II is the second phase of pre-deployment training conducted by the battalion in order to enhance unit cohesion and combat readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Wilson)
A U.S. Marine with Combined Anti-Armor Team, Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, fires a shoulder-fired Javelin missile during Exercise Bougainville II on Range 20A, Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, May 15, 2019. Bougainville II is the second phase of pre-deployment training conducted by the battalion in order to enhance unit cohesion and combat readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Wilson)
U.S. Marines with Combat Assault Company, 3rd Marine Regiment, pose for a unit photograph on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, April 1, 2019. CAC chose to showcase its capabilites by displaying amphibious assault vehicles, engineering equipment, and weapon systems. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Wilson)
U.S. Marines with 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division cross a river in route to a retransmission site that would allow to extend Very High Frequency communication range during Mountain Warfare Training 2-19 at Bridgeport, CA. Mar. 22, 2019. The Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center provides Marines the opportunity to conduct tactical exercises in a cold weather environment, adapt and overcome snow terrain to continue military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Eric Tso.)
U.S. Marines with 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division cross a river in route to a retransmission site that would allow to extend Very High Frequency communication range during Mountain Warfare Training 2-19 at Bridgeport, CA. Mar. 22, 2019. The Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center provides Marines the opportunity to conduct tactical exercises in a cold weather environment, adapt and overcome snow terrain to continue military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Eric Tso.)
U.S. Marines with 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division cross a river in route to a retransmission site that would allow to extend Very High Frequency communication range during Mountain Warfare Training 2-19 at Bridgeport, CA. Mar. 22, 2019. The Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center provides Marines the opportunity to conduct tactical exercises in a cold weather environment, adapt and overcome snow terrain to continue military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Eric Tso.)
U.S. Marines with 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division cross a river in route to a retransmission site to extend Very High Frequency communication range during Mountain Warfare Training 2-19 at Bridgeport, CA. Mar. 22, 2019. The Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center provides Marines the opportunity to conduct tactical exercises in a cold weather environment, adapt and overcome snow terrain to continue military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Eric Tso.)
U.S. Marines with 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division cross a river in route to a retransmission site to extend Very High Frequency communication range during Mountain Warfare Training 2-19 at Bridgeport, CA. Mar. 22, 2019. The Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center provides Marines the opportunity to conduct tactical exercises in a cold weather environment, adapt and overcome snow terrain to continue military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Eric Tso.)
A U.S. Marine with Echo Co., 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, observes his surroundings on a re-supply patrol during exercise Bougainville I at Kahuku Training Area, Hawaii, March 20, 2019. Bougainville I is a pre-deployment training exercise that enhances the unit’s proficiency, cohesion and combat readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Wilson)
U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Michael Ebersole, rifleman with Echo Co., 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, communicates via radio on a re-supply patrol during exercise Bougainville I at Kahuku Training Area, Hawaii, March 20, 2019. Bougainville I is a pre-deployment training exercise that enhances the unit’s proficiency, cohesion and combat readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Wilson)
A U.S. Marine with Echo Co., 2nd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, prepares for notional enemy assault during exercise Bougainville I at Kahuku Training Area, Hawaii, March 21, 2019. Bougainville I is a pre-deployment training exercise that enhances the unit’s proficiency, cohesion and combat readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Wilson)
U.S. Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. David Friets with 3d Radio Battalion, III Marine Expeditionary Force Information Group attached to 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division launches a RQ-20 Puma Small Unmanned Aircraft System during Mountain Warfare Training 2-19 at Bridgeport, CA. Mar. 16, 2019. The Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center provides Marines the opportunity to conduct tactical exercises in a cold weather environment, adapt and overcome snow terrain to continue military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Eric Tso.)
U.S. Marines with 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division fly a RQ-20 Puma Small Unmanned Aircraft System during Mountain Warfare Training 2-19 at Bridgeport, CA. Mar. 16, 2019. The Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center provides Marines the opportunity to conduct tactical exercises in a cold weather environment, adapt and overcome snow terrain to continue military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Eric Tso.)
U.S. Marine Corps radio operators with 1st Battalion, 12th Marines attached to 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division set up field expedient high frequency antennas for communication during Mountain Warfare Training 2-19 at Bridgeport, CA. Mar. 9, 2019. The Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center provides Marines the opportunity to conduct tactical exercises in a cold weather environment, adapt and overcome snow terrain to continue military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Eric Tso.)
U.S. Marines Cpl. Avery Mason, left, and Lance Cpl. Blaine Jarratt, radio operators with 1st Battalion, 12th Marines attached to 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division set up field expedient high frequency antennas for communication during Mountain Warfare Training 2-19 at Bridgeport, CA. Mar. 9, 2019. The Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center provides Marines the opportunity to conduct tactical exercises in a cold weather environment, adapt and overcome snow terrain to continue military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Eric Tso.)
U.S. Marine Corps Col. Michael S. Styskal, left, commanding officer, 3rd Marine Regiment and Sgt. Maj. Phillip J. Billiot, sergeant major, lead their Marines in a hike to Grouse Meadows during Mountain Warfare Training 2-19 at Bridgeport, CA, Mar. 2, 2019. The Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center provides Marines the opportunity to conduct tactical exercises in a cold weather environment, adapt and overcome snow terrain to continue military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Eric Tso.)
U.S. Marines with 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division dig fighting holes in snow to provide cover and concealment at Grouse Meadows during Mountain Warfare Training 2-19 at Bridgeport, CA, March 2, 2019. The Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center provides Marines the opportunity to conduct tactical exercises in a cold weather environment, adapt and overcome snow terrain to continue military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Eric Tso.)
U.S. Marines with 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division dig fighting holes in snow to provide cover and concealment at Grouse Meadows during Mountain Warfare Training 2-19 at Bridgeport, CA, March 2, 2019. The Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center provides Marines the opportunity to conduct tactical exercises in a cold weather environment, adapt and overcome snow terrain to continue military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Eric Tso.)
U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Michael Colon, intelligence specialist with 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division boils snow for water to stay hydrated at Grouse Meadows during Mountain Warfare Training 2-19 at Bridgeport, CA, March 2, 2019. The Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center provides Marines the opportunity to conduct tactical exercises in a cold weather environment, adapt and overcome snow terrain to continue military operations. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Eric Tso.)
U.S. Marines with 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division conduct a conditioning hike on the “Mountain Leader Loop” trail at Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center, Bridgeport, California, Feb. 26, 2019. The purpose of the hike was to prepare marines for the elevation, cold temperature, and wet conditions they will encounter in their upcoming training. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Eric Tso.)
U.S. Marines with 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division check their snow shoes before a conditioning hike on the “Mountain Leader Loop” trail at Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center, Bridgeport, California, Feb. 26, 2019. The purpose of the hike was to prepare marines for the elevation, cold temperature, and wet conditions they will encounter in their upcoming training. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Eric Tso.)
U.S. Marines with Kilo Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, Marine Air-Ground Task Force-6 (MAGTF-6) coordinate and execute a company attack on Range 400 during Integrated Training Exercise (ITX) 2-19 aboard Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, Calif., Jan. 31, 2019. ITX creates a challenging, realistic training environment that produces combat-ready forces capable of operating as an integrated MAGTF. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Victor A. Mancilla)
U.S. Marines with India Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, execute a company defense exercise on Range 220 during Integrated Training Exercise 2-19 at Marine Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, California, Jan. 27, 2019. ITX prepares Marines for combat situations and provides an environment that displays unit capabilities. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Wilson)
U.S. Marines with Kilo Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine, Marine Air-Ground Task Force-6 (MAGTF-6) Regiment coordinate and execute a company attack on Range 400 during Integrated Training Exercise (ITX) 2-19 aboard Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, Calif., Jan. 31, 2019. ITX creates a challenging, realistic training environment that produces combat-ready forces capable of operating as an integrated MAGTF. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Victor A. Mancilla)
U.S. Marines with India Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, execute a company defense exercise on Range 220 during Integrated Training Exercise 2-19 at Marine Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, California, Jan. 27, 2019. ITX prepares Marines for combat situations and provides an environment that displays unit capabilities. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Wilson)
U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Fernando Santana, rifleman, India Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, sights in during a company reinforced exercise on Range 400 during Integrated Training Exercise 2-19 at Marine Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, California, Jan. 30, 2019. ITX prepares Marines for combat situations and provides an environment that displays unit capabilities. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Wilson)
U.S. Marines with India Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, execute a company reinforced exercise on Range 400 during Integrated Training Exercise 2-19 at Marine Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, California, Jan. 29, 2019. ITX prepares Marines for combat situations and provides an environment that displays unit capabilities. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Wilson)
A U.S. Marine with Kilo Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, Marine Air-Ground Task Force-6 (MAGTF-6) resupplies ammunition to machine gunners while conducting a company attack on Range 400 during Integrated Training Exercise (ITX) 2-19 aboard Marine Corps Air-Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, Calif., Jan. 31, 2019. ITX creates a challenging, realistic training environment that produces combat-ready forces capable of operating as an integrated MAGTF. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Victor A. Mancilla)
Representatives from Bellator MMA spar with Marine Corps Martial Arts Instructors during a martial arts clinic on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Dec. 11, 2018. Bellator MMA and USO have partnered to host events for troops in Hawaii. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Wilson)
Football legend Herschel Walker spars with a Marines Corps Martial Arts Instructor during a martial arts clinic on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Dec. 11, 2018. Bellator MMA and USO have partnered to host events for troops in Hawaii. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Wilson)
Mixed martial artist Douglas Lima advances through an obstacle course on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Dec. 11, 2018. Bellator MMA and USO have partnered to host events for troops in Hawaii. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Wilson)
U.S. Marines with 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment show off weapons systems with sportscaster Jay Glazer and mixed martial artists Douglas Lima and Chael Sonnen on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Dec. 11, 2018. Bellator MMA and USO have partnered to host events for troops in Hawaii. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Wilson)
U.S. Marine Corps, PFC Vincent Fiore with Kilo Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment fires a Light Anti-Armor Weapon (LAW) during Exercise Bougainville II at the Pohakuloa Training Area on the Island of Hawaii, Oct. 20, 2018. Exercise Bougainville II is the 2nd part of the pre-deployment workup focusing on platoon and company level exercises. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Ricky Gomez)
U.S. Marines with 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment show off weapons systems with football legend Herschel Walker on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Dec. 11, 2018. Bellator MMA and USO have partnered to host events for troops in Hawaii. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jacob Wilson)
U.S. Marine spouses maneuver through an obstacle course during a Wahine Warrior day on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Nov. 7, 2018. This Hawaiian version of Jayne Wayne day allows the spouses of the Marines the opportunity to see what their Marine does during the work week. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Ricky Gomez)
U.S. Marines with 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division run past the Regimental Headquarters during the Regiment's 2nd annual Bougainville Day run on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Nov. 1, 2018. Bougainville Day remembers and honors the Regiment’s history. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Ricky Gomez)
U.S. Marines with 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division run past the Regimental Headquarters during the Regiment's 2nd annual Bougainville Day run on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Nov. 1, 2018. Bougainville Day remembers and honors the Regiment’s history. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Ricky Gomez)
A U.S. Marine with 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division puts a battle standard on the regiments colors during the Bougainville Day ceremony on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Nov. 1, 2018. This is the 2nd annual Bougainville Day which is to remember the regiment's history. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Ricky Gomez)
U.S. Marines assigned to 3d Battalion, 3d Marine Regiment, submerge in a simulator for Underwater Egress Training (UET) during Exercise Bougainville I on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Aug. 28, 2018. Bougainville I is the first phase of the pre-deployment training cycle for the battalion and is an exercise focused on building small-unit skills to increase proficiency in combat. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Ricky Gomez)
U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Cody Trevino, a team leader assigned to 3d Battalion, 3d Marine Regiment, maneuvers toward his objective during Exercise Bougainville I on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Aug. 29, 2018. Bougainville I is the first phase of the pre-deployment training cycle for the battalion and is an exercise focused on building small-unit skills to increase proficiency in combat. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Ricky Gomez)
U.S. Marines Lance Cpl. Nicholas Adams (left) and Lance Cpl. James Barnes (right) assigned to Kilo Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marines Regiment, work as a shooter spotter team using the M28 Designated Marksmanship Rifle to engage targets at the range during Exercise Bougainville I on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Aug. 21, 2018. Bougainville I is the first phase of the pre-deployment training cycle for the battalion and is an exercise focused on building small-unit skills to increase proficiency in combat. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Ricky Gomez)
U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Carlos Cervantes assigned to Kilo Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, fires the M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle at targets on the range during Exercise Bougainville I on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Aug. 21, 2018. Bougainville I is the first phase of the pre-deployment training cycle for the battalion and is an exercise focused on building small-unit skills to increase proficiency in combat. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Ricky Gomez)
U.S. Marines with Kilo Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment and Indonesian Marines, training with the company as part of the military exchange program, throw a football during an Indonesian Independence Day celebration at Pyramid Rock Beach on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Aug. 17, 2018. The military exchange program between Indonesia and the U.S. involves each country sending a platoon of Marines to live and train together at the other's military base. This program enhances the capability of both services and displays their continued commitment to share information and increase the ability to respond to crisis together. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Ricky Gomez)
U.S. Marines with Kilo Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment and Indonesian Marines, training with the company as part of the military exchange program, kick a soccer ball to each other during an Indonesian Independence Day celebration at Pyramid Rock Beach on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Aug. 17, 2018. The military exchange program between Indonesia and the U.S. involves each country sending a platoon of Marines to live and train together at the other's military base. This program enhances the capability of both services and displays their continued commitment to share information and increase the ability to respond to crisis together. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Ricky Gomez)
U.S. Marines with Kilo Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marines conduct a medical evacuation exercise with Indonesian Marines during the KORMAR Platoon Exchange 2018 at Antralina training area, Indonesia, August 10. 2018. The military exchange program between Indonesia and the U.S. involves each country sending a platoon of Marines to live and train together at the other’s military base. This program enhances the capability of both services and displays their continued commitment to share information and increase the ability to respond to crises together. (U.S. Marine corps photo by Lance Cpl. Eric Tso)
U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Christopher Williamson with Kilo Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marines fireman carries an Indonesian Marine to the Helicopter evacuation point in a simulated medical evacuation exercise during KORMAR Platoon Exchange 2018 at Antralina training area, Indonesia, August 10. 2018. The military exchange program between Indonesia and the U.S. involves each country sending a platoon of Marines to live and train together at the other’s military base. This program enhances the capability of both services and displays their continued commitment to share information and increase the ability to respond to crises together. (U.S. Marine corps photo by Lance Cpl. Eric Tso)
U.S. Marines with Kilo Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marines conduct Marine Corps Martial Arts Program (MCMAP) training with Indonesian Marines at Antralina training area, Indonesia, August 10, 2018. The military exchange program between Indonesia and the U.S. involves each country sending a platoon of Marines to live and train together at the other's military base. This program enhances the capability of both services and displays their continued commitment to share information and increase the ability to respond to crisis together. (U.S. Marine corps photo by Lance Cpl. Eric Tso)
U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Alec Corns with Kilo Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marines demonstrates a Marine Corps Martial Arts Program (MCMAP) technique on Indonesian Marine PFC 1st Class Franki Ganda Permana during the Korps Marinir (KORMAR) Platoon Exchange 2018 at Antralina training area, Indonesia on August 10, 2018. The KORMAR platoon exchange program between Indonesia and the U.S. involves each country sending a platoon of Marines to live and train together at the other's military base. This program enhances the capability of both services and displays their continued commitment to share information and increase the ability to respond to crisis together. (U.S. Marine corps photo by Lance Cpl. Eric Tso)
U.S. Marines with Kilo Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marines pose for a photo with Indonesian Marines after conducting Marine Corps Martial Arts Program (MCMAP) training at Antralina training area, Indonesia, August 10, 2018. The military exchange program between Indonesia and the U.S. involves each country sending a platoon of Marines to live and train together at the other's military base. This program enhances the capability of both services and displays their continued commitment to share information and increase the ability to respond to crisis together. (U.S. Marine corps photo by Lance Cpl. Eric Tso)
U.S. Marines with Kilo Company, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marines conduct Marine Corps Martial Arts Program (MCMAP) training with Indonesian Marines at Antralina training area, Indonesia, August 10, 2018. The military exchange program between Indonesia and the U.S. involves each country sending a platoon of Marines to live and train together at the other's military base. This program enhances the capability of both services and displays their continued commitment to share information and increase the ability to respond to crisis together. (U.S. Marine corps photo by Lance Cpl. Eric Tso)
U.S. Marines with 3d Battalion, 3d Marine Regiment locate notional enemy positions during Exercise Bougainville I at the Ulupau Range Training Facility on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Aug 9, 2018. Bougainville I is the first phase of the pre-deployment training cycle for the battalion, and is an exercise focused on building small-unit skills to increase proficiency in combat. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Pfc. Trevor Rowett)
U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Caleb Keller, an infantry machine gunner with 3d Battalion, 3d Marine Regiment fires at notional enemy positions during Exercise Bougainville I at the Ulupau Range Training Facility on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Aug 9, 2018. Bougainville I is the first phase of the pre-deployment training cycle for the battalion, and is an exercise focused on building small-unit skills to increase proficiency in combat. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Pvt. Trevor Rowett)
U.S. Marines with 3d Battalion, 3d Marine Regiment assault the objective during Exercise Bougainville I at the Ulupau Range Training Facility on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, August 9, 2018. Bougainville I is the first phase of the pre-deployment training cycle for the battalion and is an exercise focused on building small-unit skills to increase proficiency in combat. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Pvt. Trevor Rowett)
U.S. Marines with 3d Battalion, 3d Marine Regiment observe the range area during Exercise Bougainville I at the Ulupau Range Training Facility on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Aug 9, 2018. Bougainville I is the first phase of the pre-deployment training cycle for the battalion and is an exercise focused on building small-unit skills to increase proficiency in combat. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Pfc. Trevor Rowett)
A U.S. Marines with Kilo Co., 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment provides security while conducting military operations in urban terrain during Exercise Bougainville I on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Aug. 10, 2018. Bougainville I is the first phase of the pre-deployment training cycle for the battalion and is an exercise focused on building small-unit skills to increase proficiency in combat. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Pvt. Trevor Rowett)
Indonesian Marines, as part of a military exchange program, provide security while conducting military operations in urban terrain with Kilo Co., 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment during Exercise Bougainville I on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Aug. 10, 2018. Bougainville I is the first phase of the pre-deployment training cycle for the battalion and is an exercise focused on building small-unit skills to increase proficiency in combat. The military exchange program between Indonesia and the U.S. involves each country sending a platoon of Marines to live and train together at the other's military base. This program enhances the capability of both services and displays their continued commitment to share information and increase the ability to respond to crisis together. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Pvt. Trevor Rowett)
An Indonesian Marine, as part of a military exchange program, loads a magazine of special effects small arms marking system (SESAMS) rounds with Kilo Co., 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment during Exercise Bougainville I on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Aug. 10, 2018. Bougainville I is the first phase of the pre-deployment training cycle for the battalion and is an exercise focused on building small-unit skills to increase proficiency in combat. The military exchange program between Indonesia and the U.S. involves each country sending a platoon of Marines to live and train together at the other's military base. This program enhances the capability of both services and displays their continued commitment to share information and increase the ability to respond to crisis together. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Pvt. Trevor Rowett)
An Indonesian Marine, part of a military exchange program, prepares to conduct military operations in urban terrain during Exercise Bougainville I on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Aug. 10, 2018. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Pvt. Trevor Rowett)
U.S. Marine Corps AAV-P7/A1 assault amphibious vehicles assigned to Combat Assault Company, 3rd Marine Regiment, unload service members during an amphibious landing demonstration as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pyramid Rock Beach on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 29, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Aaron S. Patterson)
AAV-P7/A1 assault amphibious vehicles assigned to Combat Assault Company, 3rd Marine Regiment, disembark from the Royal Australion Navy landing helicopter dock ship HMAS Adelaide (L01) during an amphibious landing demonstration as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pyramid Rock Beach on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 29, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Aaron S. Patterson)
Malaysian and U.S. Marines push toward an objective on Pyramid Rock Beach during an amphibious landing demonstration as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 29, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
U.S. Marines push toward an objective on Pyramid Rock Beach during an amphibious landing demonstration as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 29, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
A Malaysian marine provides security on Pyramid Rock Beach during an amphibious landing demonstration as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 29, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
Service members from various nations stage their gear at the end of an amphibious landing demonstration as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) at Pyramid Rock Beach on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 29, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Aaron S. Patterson)
U.S. Marines assigned to Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, pose with Sri Lankan marines after the conclusion of an amphibious landing demonstration as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pyramid Rock Beach on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 29, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Aaron S. Patterson)
U.S. Marine Cpl. Michael Michehl, a line noncommissioned officer with Marine Wing Support Detachment 24, controls forward arming and refueling point operations after refueling a Bell AH-1W Super Cobra during a field test for the Expeditionary Mobile Fuel Additization Capability system as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 18, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
Indonesian Marine Sgt. Arianto looks over firing data after shooting the 105 mm howitzer during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 18, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by 2nd Lt. Colin Kennard)
U.S. Marines with Bravo Battery, 1st Battalion, 12th Marine Regiment, use a ramrod to push a round into a M777 towed 155 mm howitzer during live-fire training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 17, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
U.S. Marines with Bravo Battery, 1st Battalion, 12th Marine Regiment, fire a M777 towed 155 mm howitzer during live-fire training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 17, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
Indonesian Marine Sgt. Dedy, right, a sniper with the Indonesian Marine Corps, looks through his scope down range while U.S. Marine Cpl. Benjamin Garcia, a joint fires observer with scout sniper platoon, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, observes the shot groupings during live-fire training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 14, 2018. The live-fire training integrated sniper teams from other RIMPAC participants with U.S. Marines, which provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
U.S. Marine Cpl. Keaton Bruder, a radio operator with scout sniper platoon, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, observes Indonesian Marine Cpl. Sugeng, a scout sniper with the Indonesian Marine Corps, as he aims a sniper rifle downrange during live-fire training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 14, 2018. The live-fire training integrated sniper teams from other RIMPAC participants with U.S. Marines, which provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
U.S. Marines with Fire Control Team 3, 1st Brigade, 5th Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company, set up equipment during close air support training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 14, 2018. The training involved pilots working with a joint forward air controller to coordinate the close air support of ground troops. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, more than 45 ships and submarines, about 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
U.S. Marines hike to a firing range during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 15, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
U.S. Marine Corps 1st Sgt. Erik Velez, right, company first sergeant, Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, and a Sri Lankan Marine engage in a friendly arm-wrestling competition during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 15, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
A U.S. Marine observes a UH-1Y Huey fly towards an impact area during close air support as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 14, 2018. The training involved pilots working with a joint forward air controller to coordinate the close air support of ground troops. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Demetrius Munnerlyn)
A U.S. Marine Corps UH-1Y Huey and AH-1Z Viper helicopter fly toward a target during close air support as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 14, 2018. The training involved pilots working with a joint forward air controller to coordinate the close air support of ground troops. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Demetrius Munnerlyn)
U.S. Marine Corps Capt. Rowdy Meinen, assistant air officer with 3rd Marine Regiment, relays coordinates during an air assault training event as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 14, 2018. Meinen is the officer in charge of the joint forward air controller, which helps coordinate the close air support of ground troops. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Demetrius Munnerlyn)
Japan Ground Self-Defense Force Sgt. 1st Class Masakatsu Sugimoto, right, a samurai martial arts instructor with 2nd Amphibious Rapid Deployment Regiment, and U.S. Marine Corps 1st. Sgt. William Radebaugh, company first sergeant, Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, spar with each other while waiting for the next training event during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 13, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
Chilean Marine Cpl. German Letelier, a squad leader with 1st Platoon, 211 Company, 21 Battalion, Chilean Marine Corps, engages enemy combatant role players during a noncombatant evacuation operation (NEO) training event as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii July 12, 2018. A NEO is conducted to evacuate citizens whose lives are in danger. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
Philippine and U.S. Marines stack alongside a building to engage enemy combatant role players during a noncombatant evacuation operation (NEO) training event as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 12, 2018. A NEO is conducted to evacuate citizens whose lives are in danger. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
U.S. Marines with Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, secure an enemy position during a live-fire training event as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 13, 2018. The live-fire training integrated fire teams from other RIMPAC participants with U.S. Marines, which provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
U.S. Marines with Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, maneuver to secure a notional enemy position during a live-fire training event as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 13, 2018. The live-fire training integrated fire teams from other RIMPAC participants with U.S. Marines, which provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Marco Martinez, a crew chief with Combat Assault Company, 3rd Marine Regiment, observes loading drills onto an AAV-P7/A1 assault amphibious vehicle aboard the Royal Australian Navy landing helicopter dock ship HMAS Adelaide (L01) as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise off the coast of Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 11, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity while fostering and sustaining cooperative relationships among participants critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2018 is the 26th exercise in the series that began in 1971. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
Philippine and U.S. Marines maneuver toward an objective during a noncombatant evacuation operation (NEO) training event as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 12, 2018. A NEO is conducted to evacuate U.S. citizens whose lives are in danger. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Fabian Covaclembcke, a crewman with Combat Assault Company, 3rd Marine Regiment, shows Tongan marines the safety measures while boarding an AAV-P7/A1 assault amphibious vehicles aboard the Royal Australian Navy landing helicopter dock ship HMAS Adelaide (L01) during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at sea off the coast of Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 11, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity while fostering and sustaining cooperative relationships among participants critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2018 is the 26th exercise in the series that began in 1971. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
U.S. Marines with Combat Assault Company, 3rd Marine Regiment, in AAV-P7/A1 assault amphibious vehicles are staged in formation prior to splash training at Pyramid Rock Beach as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 8, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine-Air Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Alex Rojo, a crew chief with Combat Assault Company, 3rd Marine Regiment, awaits orders to enter the water during splash training at Pyramid Rock Beach as part of the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 8, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine-Air Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
A Philippine marine maneuvers toward a landing zone during an air-assault rehearsal as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 6, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
Philippine and U.S. Marines with Company A, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, disembark from a CH-53 Super Stallion helicopter and post security during an air-assault rehearsal as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 6, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
Philippine marines and U.S. Marines with Company A, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, post security around a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter during an air-assault rehearsal as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 6, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
Chilean Navy Commodore Pablo Niemann, Combined Force Maritime Component Commander for Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise, speaks with RIMPAC participants on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 6, 2018. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world’s largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity while fostering and sustaining cooperative relationships among participants critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security of the world’s oceans. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
U.S. Marines with Company C, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, and Malaysian soldiers conduct buddy rushes during assault amphibious vehicle familiarization training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 5, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
U.S. Marines with the 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion jump from a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter during helo-cast training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise off the coast of Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 30, 2018. The helo-cast training is meant to prepare the service members for an amphibious insertion during RIMPAC. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
Australian soldiers board a CH-53 E Super Stallion helicopter prior to conducting a helo cast during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 30, 2018. The helo cast training is meant to prepare the service members for an amphibious insertion during RIMPAC. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
Australian soldiers and Philippine Marines team together on a Zodiac Mark 2 Grand Raider general purpose inflatable boat during a beach insertion rehearsal as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 1, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
An Australian soldier swims to shore during a helo-cast drills as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 29, 2018. The helo-cast training is meant to prepare the service members for an amphibious insertion during RIMPAC. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
Philippine Marines simulate a beach raid during a beach insertion rehearsal as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 1, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
Australian soldiers carry a combat rubber raiding craft into the water during helo-cast drills as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 29, 2018. The helo-cast training is meant to prepare the service members for an amphibious insertion during RIMPAC. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
U.S. Marine Corps Col. Michael S. Styskal, commander, 3rd Marine Regiment, provides a tour of the training facilities aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii to members of the U.S. Army participating in Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise July 1, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
U.S. Marine Corps Col. Michael S. Styskal, commander, 3rd Marine Regiment, provides a tour of the training facilities aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii to members of the U.S. Army participating in Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise July 1, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Jacob Steenweg, a rifleman with Marine Air Ground Task Force-Hawaii, sights in on with an enhanced F88 Austeyr rifle during a live fire training event as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at the Ulupa’u Crater Range Training Facility on Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 29, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
Australian soldiers and U.S. Marines fire M9 pistols during a live fire training event as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at the Ulupa’u Crater Range Training Facility on Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 29, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
An Indonesian Marine fires a stimulated M16A4 assault rifle at an indoor simulated marksmanship trainer during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) on Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 30, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
Malaysian soldiers practice loading and offloading assault amphibious vehicles during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 5, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable MAGTF and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
An Indonesian Marine surfaces from the water during shallow water egress training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 5, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
A Philippine Marine clears a room during urban operations training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 28, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, more than 45 ships and submarines, about 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
A Philippine Marine clears a room during urban operations training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 28, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, more than 45 ships and submarines, about 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
Indonesian Marines participate in shallow water egress training during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 5, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
U.S. Marines with the 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion and Japanese soldiers with 2nd Regiment, Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade, carry a combat rubber raiding craft ashore after during amphibious operations as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 2, 2018. Twenty-Five nations, more than 45 ships and submarines, about 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity while fostering and sustaining cooperative relationships among participants critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security of the world's oceans. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
A U.S. Marine with the 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion jumps from a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter during amphibious operations as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 2, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
A Philippine Marine clears a room during urban operations training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 28, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, more than 45 ships and submarines, about 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
A Philippine Marine clears a room during urban operations training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 28, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, more than 45 ships and submarines, about 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
A Philippine Marine clears a room during urban operations training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 28, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, more than 45 ships and submarines, about 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
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Charlie Co. Executes Island Marauder
III Marine Expeditionary Force
Sept. 25, 2019 | 1:31
U.S. Marines with Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, conduct exercise Island Marauder on Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay, Sept. 25, 2019. Exercise Island Marauder is a training event in which Marines conducted different scenarios while testing new technology on the battlefield. (U.S. Marine Corps video by Lance Cpl Jacob Wilson)
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