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3d Marine Regiment

 

3d Marine Regiment

3d Marine Division

Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii
U.S. Marines, Army test fueling systems during RIMPAC
180718-M-FA245-0006
U.S. Marine Cpl. Michael Michehl, a line noncommissioned officer with Marine Wing Support Detachment 24, controls forward arming and refueling point operations after refueling a Bell AH-1W Super Cobra during a field test for the Expeditionary Mobile Fuel Additization Capability system as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 18, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
Indonesian Marine calculates firing data during RIMPAC
180718-M-CZ791-0001
Indonesian Marine Sgt. Arianto looks over firing data after shooting the 105 mm howitzer during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 18, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by 2nd Lt. Colin Kennard)
U.S. Marines deliver the boom during RIMPAC
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U.S. Marines with Bravo Battery, 1st Battalion, 12th Marine Regiment, use a ramrod to push a round into a M777 towed 155 mm howitzer during live-fire training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 17, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
U.S. Marines deliver the boom during RIMPAC
180717-M-FA245-1353
U.S. Marines with Bravo Battery, 1st Battalion, 12th Marine Regiment, fire a M777 towed 155 mm howitzer during live-fire training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 17, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
Indonesian and U.S. Marine snipers hit the range during RIMPAC
180714-M-FA245-1056
Indonesian Marine Sgt. Dedy, right, a sniper with the Indonesian Marine Corps, looks through his scope down range while U.S. Marine Cpl. Benjamin Garcia, a joint fires observer with scout sniper platoon, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, observes the shot groupings during live-fire training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 14, 2018. The live-fire training integrated sniper teams from other RIMPAC participants with U.S. Marines, which provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
Indonesian and U.S. Marine snipers hit the range during RIMPAC
180714-M-FA245-1029
U.S. Marine Cpl. Keaton Bruder, a radio operator with scout sniper platoon, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, observes Indonesian Marine Cpl. Sugeng, a scout sniper with the Indonesian Marine Corps, as he aims a sniper rifle downrange during live-fire training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 14, 2018. The live-fire training integrated sniper teams from other RIMPAC participants with U.S. Marines, which provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
Marines conduct CAS during RIMPAC
180714-M-FA245-2005
U.S. Marines with Fire Control Team 3, 1st Brigade, 5th Air Naval Gunfire Liaison Company, set up equipment during close air support training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 14, 2018. The training involved pilots working with a joint forward air controller to coordinate the close air support of ground troops. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, more than 45 ships and submarines, about 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
U.S. Marines hike on Island of Hawaii during RIMPAC
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U.S. Marines hike to a firing range during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 15, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
Sri Lankan and U.S. Marine arm wrestle during RIMPAC
180715-M-FA245-2163
U.S. Marine Corps 1st Sgt. Erik Velez, right, company first sergeant, Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, and a Sri Lankan Marine engage in a friendly arm-wrestling competition during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 15, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
U.S. Marines conduct close air support during RIMPAC
180714-M-ZE445-0023
A U.S. Marine observes a UH-1Y Huey fly towards an impact area during close air support as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 14, 2018. The training involved pilots working with a joint forward air controller to coordinate the close air support of ground troops. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Demetrius Munnerlyn)
U.S. Marines conduct close air support during RIMPAC
180714-M-ZE445-0001
A U.S. Marine Corps UH-1Y Huey and AH-1Z Viper helicopter fly toward a target during close air support as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 14, 2018. The training involved pilots working with a joint forward air controller to coordinate the close air support of ground troops. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Demetrius Munnerlyn)
U.S. Marines conduct close air support during RIMPAC
180714-M-ZE445-0010
U.S. Marine Corps Capt. Rowdy Meinen, assistant air officer with 3rd Marine Regiment, relays coordinates during an air assault training event as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 14, 2018. Meinen is the officer in charge of the joint forward air controller, which helps coordinate the close air support of ground troops. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Demetrius Munnerlyn)
Japanese solders and U.S. Marines train together during RIMPAC
180713-M-FA245-1278
Japan Ground Self-Defense Force Sgt. 1st Class Masakatsu Sugimoto, right, a samurai martial arts instructor with 2nd Amphibious Rapid Deployment Regiment, and U.S. Marine Corps 1st. Sgt. William Radebaugh, company first sergeant, Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, spar with each other while waiting for the next training event during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 13, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
ROK and Chilean Marines practice NEO together during RIMPAC on Island of Hawaii
180712-M-FA245-0417
A Chilean marine and Republic of Korea marine clear a stairwell during a noncombatant evacuation operation (NEO) training event as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 12, 2018. A NEO is conducted to evacuate citizens whose lives are in danger. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
U.S. Marines and RIMPAC participants practice NEO on Island of Hawaii
180712-M-FA245-0165
Chilean Marine Cpl. German Letelier, a squad leader with 1st Platoon, 211 Company, 21 Battalion, Chilean Marine Corps, engages enemy combatant role players during a noncombatant evacuation operation (NEO) training event as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii July 12, 2018. A NEO is conducted to evacuate citizens whose lives are in danger. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
ROK Marines practice NEO on Island of Hawaii
180712-M-FA245-0349
A Republic of Korea marine clears a building during a noncombatant evacuation operation (NEO) training event as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 12, 2018. A NEO is conducted to evacuate citizens whose lives are in danger. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
U.S. Marines and RIMPAC participants practice NEO on Island of Hawaii
180712-M-FA245-0194
Philippine and U.S. Marines stack alongside a building to engage enemy combatant role players during a noncombatant evacuation operation (NEO) training event as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 12, 2018. A NEO is conducted to evacuate citizens whose lives are in danger. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
U.S. Marines train with RIMPAC participants on Island of Hawaii
180713-M-FA245-1384
U.S. Marines with Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, secure an enemy position during a live-fire training event as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 13, 2018. The live-fire training integrated fire teams from other RIMPAC participants with U.S. Marines, which provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
U.S. Marines train with RIMPAC participants on Island of Hawaii
180713-M-FA245-1402
U.S. Marines with Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, maneuver to secure a notional enemy position during a live-fire training event as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 13, 2018. The live-fire training integrated fire teams from other RIMPAC participants with U.S. Marines, which provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
Tongan Marines get familiar with AAVs aboard HMAS Adelaide during RIMPAC
170711-M-ZO893-1027
U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Marco Martinez, a crew chief with Combat Assault Company, 3rd Marine Regiment, observes loading drills onto an AAV-P7/A1 assault amphibious vehicle aboard the Royal Australian Navy landing helicopter dock ship HMAS Adelaide (L01) as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise off the coast of Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 11, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity while fostering and sustaining cooperative relationships among participants critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2018 is the 26th exercise in the series that began in 1971. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
U.S. Marines and RIMPAC participants practice NEO on Island of Hawaii
180712-M-FA245-0060
Philippine and U.S. Marines maneuver toward an objective during a noncombatant evacuation operation (NEO) training event as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 12, 2018. A NEO is conducted to evacuate U.S. citizens whose lives are in danger. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
Tongan Marines get familiar with AAVs aboard HMAS Adelaide during RIMPAC
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U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Fabian Covaclembcke, a crewman with Combat Assault Company, 3rd Marine Regiment, shows Tongan marines the safety measures while boarding an AAV-P7/A1 assault amphibious vehicles aboard the Royal Australian Navy landing helicopter dock ship HMAS Adelaide (L01) during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at sea off the coast of Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 11, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity while fostering and sustaining cooperative relationships among participants critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the world's oceans. RIMPAC 2018 is the 26th exercise in the series that began in 1971. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
U.S. Marines with AAVs splash in RIMPAC during RIMPAC
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U.S. Marines with Combat Assault Company, 3rd Marine Regiment, in AAV-P7/A1 assault amphibious vehicles are staged in formation prior to splash training at Pyramid Rock Beach as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 8, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine-Air Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
U.S. Marines with AAVs splash in RIMPAC during RIMPAC
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U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Alex Rojo, a crew chief with Combat Assault Company, 3rd Marine Regiment, awaits orders to enter the water during splash training at Pyramid Rock Beach as part of the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 8, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly capable Marine-Air Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
Philippine, U.S. Marines rehearse air assault during RIMPAC
180706-M-KC456-1094
A Philippine marine maneuvers toward a landing zone during an air-assault rehearsal as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 6, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
Philippine, U.S. Marines rehearse air assault during RIMPAC
180706-M-KC456-1114
Philippine and U.S. Marines with Company A, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, disembark from a CH-53 Super Stallion helicopter and post security during an air-assault rehearsal as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 6, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
Philippine, U.S. Marines rehearse air assault during RIMPAC
180706-M-KC456-1076
Philippine marines and U.S. Marines with Company A, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, post security around a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter during an air-assault rehearsal as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 6, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
Chilean Navy Commodore visits MCBH during RIMPAC
180706-M-FA245-1212
Chilean Navy Commodore Pablo Niemann, Combined Force Maritime Component Commander for Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise, speaks with RIMPAC participants on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 6, 2018. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world’s largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity while fostering and sustaining cooperative relationships among participants critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security of the world’s oceans. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
RIMPAC participants get familiar with AAVs
180705-M-KC456-1086
U.S. Marines with Company C, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, and Malaysian soldiers conduct buddy rushes during assault amphibious vehicle familiarization training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 5, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
RIMPAC participants practice helo casting in Hawaii
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U.S. Marines with the 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion jump from a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter during helo-cast training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise off the coast of Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 30, 2018. The helo-cast training is meant to prepare the service members for an amphibious insertion during RIMPAC. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
RIMPAC participants practice helo casting in Hawaii
180630-M-KC456-1020
Australian soldiers board a CH-53 E Super Stallion helicopter prior to conducting a helo cast during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 30, 2018. The helo cast training is meant to prepare the service members for an amphibious insertion during RIMPAC. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
Australians, Philippines conduct beach insertions during RIMPAC
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Australian soldiers and Philippine Marines team together on a Zodiac Mark 2 Grand Raider general purpose inflatable boat during a beach insertion rehearsal as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 1, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
Australian soldiers, U.S. Marines prepare for helo cast drills during RIMPAC
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An Australian soldier swims to shore during a helo-cast drills as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 29, 2018. The helo-cast training is meant to prepare the service members for an amphibious insertion during RIMPAC. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
Philippine Marines conduct beach insertions during RIMPAC
180701-M-ZO893-1108
Philippine Marines simulate a beach raid during a beach insertion rehearsal as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 1, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
Australian soldiers, U.S. Marines prepare for helo cast drills during RIMPAC
180629-M-KC456-1098
Australian soldiers carry a combat rubber raiding craft into the water during helo-cast drills as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 29, 2018. The helo-cast training is meant to prepare the service members for an amphibious insertion during RIMPAC. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
U.S. Army visits MCBH during RIMPAC
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U.S. Marine Corps Col. Michael S. Styskal, commander, 3rd Marine Regiment, provides a tour of the training facilities aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii to members of the U.S. Army participating in Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise July 1, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
U.S. Army visits MCBH during RIMPAC
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U.S. Marine Corps Col. Michael S. Styskal, commander, 3rd Marine Regiment, provides a tour of the training facilities aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii to members of the U.S. Army participating in Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise July 1, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
Australians, U.S. take down targets during RIMPAC
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U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Jacob Steenweg, a rifleman with Marine Air Ground Task Force-Hawaii, sights in on with an enhanced F88 Austeyr rifle during a live fire training event as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at the Ulupa’u Crater Range Training Facility on Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 29, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California.(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
Australians, U.S. take down targets during RIMPAC
180628-M-FA245-1005
Australian soldiers and U.S. Marines fire M9 pistols during a live fire training event as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at the Ulupa’u Crater Range Training Facility on Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 29, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
Indonesian Marines get hands on with ISMT weapons during RIMPAC
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An Indonesian Marine fires a stimulated M16A4 assault rifle at an indoor simulated marksmanship trainer during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) on Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 30, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
RIMPAC participants get familiar with AAVs
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Malaysian soldiers practice loading and offloading assault amphibious vehicles during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 5, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable MAGTF and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
Indonesian Marines undergo SWET during RIMPAC
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An Indonesian Marine surfaces from the water during shallow water egress training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 5, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
RIMPAC participants go virtual for artillery training
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A Philippine Marine clears a room during urban operations training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 28, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, more than 45 ships and submarines, about 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
RIMPAC participants go virtual for artillery training
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A Philippine Marine clears a room during urban operations training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 28, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, more than 45 ships and submarines, about 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
Indonesian Marines undergo SWET during RIMPAC
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Indonesian Marines participate in shallow water egress training during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 5, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Adam Montera)
RIMPAC participants practice amphib operations in Hawaii
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U.S. Marines with the 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion and Japanese soldiers with 2nd Regiment, Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade, carry a combat rubber raiding craft ashore after during amphibious operations as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 2, 2018. Twenty-Five nations, more than 45 ships and submarines, about 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. The world's largest international maritime exercise, RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity while fostering and sustaining cooperative relationships among participants critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security of the world's oceans. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
RIMPAC participants practice amphib operations in Hawaii
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A U.S. Marine with the 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion jumps from a CH-53E Super Stallion helicopter during amphibious operations as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise on Marine Corps Base Hawaii July 2, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Thomas P. Miller)
RIMPAC participants go virtual for artillery training
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A Philippine Marine clears a room during urban operations training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 28, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, more than 45 ships and submarines, about 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
Philippine, U.S. Marines train together during RIMPAC
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A Philippine Marine clears a room during urban operations training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 28, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, more than 45 ships and submarines, about 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
Philippine, U.S. Marines train together during RIMPAC
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A Philippine Marine clears a room during urban operations training as part of Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise aboard Marine Corps Base Hawaii June 28, 2018. RIMPAC provides high-value training for task-organized, highly-capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, more than 45 ships and submarines, about 200 aircraft, and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Zachary Orr)
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Japanese Soldiers, Tongan and U.S. Marines work together on Island of Hawaii during RIMPAC
III Marine Expeditionary Force
July 13, 2018 | 0:51
180713-M-TL103-5001 POHAKULOA TRAINING AREA, Hawaii (July 13, 2018) Royal Tongan Marines, Japanese soldiers and U.S. Marines advance toward an objective during a live-fire training event during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercise at Pohakuloa Training Area, Hawaii, July 13, 2018. The live-fire training integrated fire teams from other RIMPAC participants with U.S. Marines, which provides high-value training for a task-organized, highly capable Marine Air-Ground Task Force and enhances the critical crisis response capability of U.S. Marines in the Pacific. Twenty-five nations, 46 ships, five submarines, about 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in RIMPAC from June 27 to Aug. 2 in and around the Hawaiian Islands and Southern California. (U.S. Marine Corps video by Lance Cpl. Eric Tso)


Interview:
U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Donald Cicotte
squad leader with Bravo Company
1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment
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Regiment News Snapshot
A Marine’s final ride remembered

By Sgt. Jesus Sepulveda Torres | 3rd Marine Regiment | April 13, 2018

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Lance Cpl. Austin Cahill was a vehicle commander with Combined Anti-Armor Team 1, Weapons Company, 1st Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment.

Cahill’s family, close friends and his unit attended the service to pay respects.

One of his best friends, Lance Cpl. Andrew Carranza, a vehicle commander with CAAT 1, spoke about him at the service.

“He was a really goofy and standup guy,” he said. “He loved riding his motorcycle, and I always nagged him about how dangerous motorcycles are like a parent since I was a bit older.”

Carranza said they were inseparable and could find them always by each other.

“We’ve been together since the beginning,” Carranza said. “Myself, Cahill and Lindsay are like the three stooges, you can always point us out. As brothers, we have always messed with each other, but no one outside our three man wolf pack really clicked with us. I’m going to really miss him.”

He said within a few years they conducted multiple exercises and training events as a team.

“The best and worse times were during training, we had each other’s back,” Carranza said. “Our last field exercise was last year and it was our first overseas experience. He was so motivating and got our spirits up through the thickest of times especially thanks to his hard southern accent which made us laugh.”

He said Cahill was a great Marine and an even better friend, he may be gone but his spirit rides.

1st Sgt. Mathew Kidder, the company first sergeant for Weapons Co., 1st Bn., 3rd Marines, oversees the training and development of his Marines, including Cahill.

“He was a more than capable machine gunner for his section which is a hard thing to find,” he said. “He brought a lot into the fight with that skillset.”

Kidder said that the prior Friday on April 5, 2018 a memorial ride with motorcycle riders and cars was held to honor Cahill.

“We rode across base with multiple riders and cars,” he said “It was one last final ride to send him off.”

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3d Marine Regiment Leaders
Colonel Michael S. Styskal By | August 18, 2016
Sergeant Major Phillip J. Billiot By | August 19, 2016
MARINE CORPS BASE HAWAII