3d Reconnaissance Battalion

 

3d Reconnaissance Battalion

3d Marine Division

Okinawa, Japan
U.S. Marine Cpl. Richard J. Bennaugh fires training rounds from a Daewoo K201 grenade launcher Feb. 5 during Korean Marine Exchange Program 15-3 at Gimpo, Republic of Korea. The U.S. Marines fired six training rounds and then watched a live fire shoot demonstrated by Republic of Korea Marines. The U.S. Marines were given the unique opportunity to also test out the Daewoo K1 submachine gun, Daewoo K5 handgun, the Daewoo K2 assault rifle and the Daewoo K14 sniper rifle. Bennaugh, from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, is a reconnaissance man with Alpha Company, 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force.
US Marines operate ROK weapons
U.S. Marine Cpl. Richard J. Bennaugh fires training rounds from a Daewoo K201 grenade launcher Feb. 5 during Korean Marine Exchange Program 15-3 at Gimpo, Republic of Korea. The U.S. Marines fired six training rounds and then watched a live fire shoot demonstrated by Republic of Korea Marines. The U.S. Marines were given the unique opportunity to also test out the Daewoo K1 submachine gun, Daewoo K5 handgun, the Daewoo K2 assault rifle and the Daewoo K14 sniper rifle. Bennaugh, from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, is a reconnaissance man with Alpha Company, 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force.
U.S. and Republic of Korea Marines hike a 35- km path up a mountain Jan. 15 during Korean Marine Exchange Program 15-3 in Pyeongchang, Republic of Korea. The U.S. Marines hiked side-by-side with their ROK Marine counterparts through snow and ice. The U.S. Marines are reconnaissance men with Alpha Company, 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force. The ROK Marines are force reconnaissance men with 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Division.
US, ROK Marines ruck over mountains
U.S. and Republic of Korea Marines hike a 35- km path up a mountain Jan. 15 during Korean Marine Exchange Program 15-3 in Pyeongchang, Republic of Korea. The U.S. Marines hiked side-by-side with their ROK Marine counterparts through snow and ice. The U.S. Marines are reconnaissance men with Alpha Company, 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force. The ROK Marines are force reconnaissance men with 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Division.
Republic of Korea Marines hike a 35- km path up a mountain Jan. 15 during Korean Marine Exchange Program 15-3 in Pyeongchang, Republic of Korea. The ROK Marines were training for mountain warfare and snow mobility warfare alongside their U.S. counterparts from Alpha Company, 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force. The ROK Marines are force reconnaissance men with 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Division.
US, ROK Marines ruck over mountains
Republic of Korea Marines hike a 35- km path up a mountain Jan. 15 during Korean Marine Exchange Program 15-3 in Pyeongchang, Republic of Korea. The ROK Marines were training for mountain warfare and snow mobility warfare alongside their U.S. counterparts from Alpha Company, 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force. The ROK Marines are force reconnaissance men with 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Division.
U.S. Marine Cpl. Matthew G. Smith practices skiing downhill during Korean Marine Exchange Program 15-3 Jan. 28 in Pyeongchang, Republic of Korea. The Marines were practicing basic and advanced skiing techniques alongside Republic of Korea Marines. Smith is a reconnaissance man with Alpha Company, 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force.
Snow skiing mobility training for Marines
U.S. Marine Cpl. Matthew G. Smith practices skiing downhill during Korean Marine Exchange Program 15-3 Jan. 28 in Pyeongchang, Republic of Korea. The Marines were practicing basic and advanced skiing techniques alongside Republic of Korea Marines. Smith is a reconnaissance man with Alpha Company, 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force.
U.S. Marine Cpl. Richard J. Bennaugh puts on his skis during Korean Marine Exchange Program 15-3 Jan. 26 in Pyeongchang, Republic of Korea. ROK and U.S. Marines learned how to ski, together, during snow mobility training. Training included stopping, turning, proper falling techniques and how to quickly climb up slopes with skis on. Bennaugh, a native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, is a reconnaissance Marine with Alpha Company, 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force. The Republic of Korea Marines are with Alpha Company, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Division.
Snow skiing mobility training for Marines
U.S. Marine Cpl. Richard J. Bennaugh puts on his skis during Korean Marine Exchange Program 15-3 Jan. 26 in Pyeongchang, Republic of Korea. ROK and U.S. Marines learned how to ski, together, during snow mobility training. Training included stopping, turning, proper falling techniques and how to quickly climb up slopes with skis on. Bennaugh, a native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, is a reconnaissance Marine with Alpha Company, 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force. The Republic of Korea Marines are with Alpha Company, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Division.
Staff Sgt. Timothy D. Cunningham enters the water May 7 off the shore of Camp Schwab. Marines and sailors executed sustainment training to enhance their scuba diving skills and tactics. “This training is important because diving is inherently dangerous, so we need to do this in order to maintain proficiency,” said Cunningham, an Albany, N.Y., native. “We need to not only concentrate on our closed circuit training, but our open circuit scuba diving proficiency as well.” Cunningham is an assistant team leader and reconnaissance man with 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force.
Recon Marines and sailors dive into training
Staff Sgt. Timothy D. Cunningham enters the water May 7 off the shore of Camp Schwab. Marines and sailors executed sustainment training to enhance their scuba diving skills and tactics. “This training is important because diving is inherently dangerous, so we need to do this in order to maintain proficiency,” said Cunningham, an Albany, N.Y., native. “We need to not only concentrate on our closed circuit training, but our open circuit scuba diving proficiency as well.” Cunningham is an assistant team leader and reconnaissance man with 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force.
Cpl. Christopher M. Casilio gives the OK signal during dive training May 7 off the shore of Camp Schwab. Marines and sailors executed sustainment training to enhance their basic scuba diving skills and tactics. “It is like any perishable knowledge – if you do not do it, you are going to lose it,” said Casilio, a Bethlehem, Pa., native. “Diving is inherently dangerous because the human body is not meant to go underwater for that duration.” Casilio is a team leader and reconnaissance man with 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force.
Recon Marines and sailors dive into training
Cpl. Christopher M. Casilio gives the OK signal during dive training May 7 off the shore of Camp Schwab. Marines and sailors executed sustainment training to enhance their basic scuba diving skills and tactics. “It is like any perishable knowledge – if you do not do it, you are going to lose it,” said Casilio, a Bethlehem, Pa., native. “Diving is inherently dangerous because the human body is not meant to go underwater for that duration.” Casilio is a team leader and reconnaissance man with 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force.
Sgt. Scott Hulsizer (center), a team leader with second platoon, Bravo Company, 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, based in Okinawa, Japan, provides suppressive fire for his squad during a live-fire immediate action drill at the Kaneohe Bay Range Training Facility, March 3, 2014. 3rd Recon Bn. fired multiple weapon systems as part of a two day weapons package for Exercise Sandfisher. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Matthew Bragg)
3rd Recon demonstrates firepower versatility
Sgt. Scott Hulsizer (center), a team leader with second platoon, Bravo Company, 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division, based in Okinawa, Japan, provides suppressive fire for his squad during a live-fire immediate action drill at the Kaneohe Bay Range Training Facility, March 3, 2014. 3rd Recon Bn. fired multiple weapon systems as part of a two day weapons package for Exercise Sandfisher. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Matthew Bragg)
3d Reconnaissance Battalion Leaders

 

 

 

Commanding Officer
3d Reconnaissance Battalion
Lieutenant Colonel Scott Gehris
 
Sergeant Major
3d Reconnaissance Battalion
Sergeant Major Wesley L. Misenhimer

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Unit News
US Marines operate ROK weapons

By Cpl. Tyler Giguere | February 24, 2015

Marines step forward onto the firing range, leveling their sites on their targets, they await the MORE
US, ROK Marines ruck over mountains

By Cpl. Tyler Giguere | February 24, 2015

U.S. Marines prepare for a 35- km hike by going through a 10- km looped course every day for a week. MORE
Snow skiing mobility training for Marines

By Cpl. Tyler Giguere | February 23, 2015

Republic of Korea and U.S. Marines grab their rifles, skis and packs and begin a trek straight to MORE
MISSION
The current mission of the 3d Reconnaissance Battalion is to conduct ground and amphibious reconnaissance and surveillance along with other operations as directed in support of the 3d Marine Division.
BATTALION CONTACT INFORMATION
Unit Address

3D Recon BN
Unit 36180
FPO AP 96389-6180

COMMAND DUTY OFFICER
090-6861-7120

FRO
315-625-8762

S-1 Section
315-625-2689
THE RECON CREED
THE RECON CREED Realizing it is my choice and my
choice alone to be a Reconnaissance Marine,
I accept all challenges involved with this profession.
Forever shall I strive to maintain the tremendous reputation of those who went before me.

Exceeding beyond the limitations
set down by others shall be my goal.
Sacrificing personal comforts and dedicating myself
to the completion of the reconnaissance mission shall be my life. Physical fitness, mental attitude, and high
ethics -The title of Recon Marine is my honor.

Conquering all obstacles, both large and small,
I shall never quit. To quit, to surrender, to give up is to fail. To be a Recon Marine is to surpass failure;
To overcome, to adapt and to do whatever it takes
to complete the mission.

On the battlefield, as in all areas of life, I shall stand tall above the competition.
Through professional pride, integrity, and teamwork,
I shall be the example for all Marines to emulate.

Never shall I forget the principles
I accepted to become a Recon Marine.
Honor, Perseverance, Spirit and Heart.

A Recon Marine can speak without saying a word
and achieve what others can only imagine.